The material presented is an invaluable source of infor­mation for imperial portraiture and titulature, the response of the cities to the establishment of a new political order under the Roman empire, the way the government controlled the provinces, the internal history of the cities, and the role of the provincial coinage in the economy of

Kleiner (1992): 207-212 (intro to Trajan; portraiture of Trajan and Plotina) 237-42 (intro to Hadrian; portraiture Hadrian and Sabina), 253-56 (Arco di Portogallo Reliefs and Adventus Relief), 267-80 (intro Antonines and Antonine portraiture), 283-85 (intro Antonine State Releifs and Hadrianeum reliefs), 288-95 (Marcus Aurelius Reliefs) Roman Sculpture: History, Characteristics, Types 2016-3-4 · Antonine Dynasty Sculpture (138-192 CE) The effects of the Hadrianic revival lasted for many years. They are evident in most of the reliefs from the reigns of the Antonine emperors, Antoninus Pius (138-161), Marcus Aurelius (161-180), and Commodus (180-192). Online Scholarly Catalogues at the Art Institute of Chicago Welcome to the Art Institute’s online scholarly catalogues. James Ensor: The Temptation of Saint Anthony is an exhibition catalogue which features essays by Susan M. Canning, Patrick Florizoone and Nancy Ireson, Anna Swinbourne, Debora Silverman, and Kimberly J. Nichols. Monet Paintings and Drawings at the Art Institute of Chicago and Renoir Paintings and Drawings at the Art Institute of RPC — Home The material presented is an invaluable source of infor­mation for imperial portraiture and titulature, the response of the cities to the establishment of a new political order under the Roman empire, the way the government controlled the provinces, the internal history of the cities, and the role of the provincial coinage in the economy of

25, pl. 34; (3) Roman couple as Mars and Venus, from the so-called basilica at Ostia (late Antonine period Second-Century Mythological Portraiture 25-26 Musei Capitolini

Dynastic Commemoration and Imperial Portraiture in the DOI: 10.2307/506122 Corpus ID: 194117860. Dynastic Commemoration and Imperial Portraiture in the Julio-Claudian Period @inproceedings{Vermeule1998DynasticCA, title={Dynastic Commemoration and Imperial Portraiture in the Julio-Claudian Period}, author={Cornelius C. Vermeule and Charles Brian Rose}, year={1998} }

A ROMAN MARBLE PORTRAIT HEAD OF A WOMAN LATE ANTONINE TO EARLY SEVERAN PERIOD, CIRCA 190 A.D. The youthful woman with her head angled slightly to her right, with an oval face, her center-parted hair pulled loosely into a large spiralling bun, the individual locks delineated, the deep groove of the part running across the entire crown of her head, some wisps along her neck, her …

Antoninus Pius was adopted by Hadrian as his successor when he was already fifty-one years old. His portraits thus represent him as a mature man in a sober but refined style that consciously echoes the imperial imagery adopted by Hadrian. Roman Portrait Sculpture in ancient times Roman portraiture evolved during the different stages is seen in details such as: • The eyes and the way of representing the beard and hair. • Shows the fashion in women’s hairstyles. The Roman portrait in the Republic • Sculpture has great realism, with a much accentuated facial features, that still resemble the mayorum masks.